Industrial

Quality Lubricants for Ships and Other Marine Vehicles

Industrial Solutions

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Customer Challenge:
A machine tool manufacture in Kansas rebuilt a shop lathe for a customer. The lathe worked fine, but the noise level was very close to the maximum allowed by OSHA standards, 80 db. They tried everything they could, but nothing worked.

PPGI Solution:
They added Petron Plus Transmission & Gear Box Supplement to the main gear box. It reduced the decibel level from 79 db to 73 db, and it only took five minutes of operation to notice the difference. They added Petron Plus Transmission & Gear Box Supplement to a smaller gear box, and in approx. 15 minutes they recorder a decibel reading of 71 db, well within OSHA standards.

Customer Challenge:
A major aircraft manufacture in California had reported high scrap problems on the aluminum skins (while being stretched) used on a fighter plane.

PPGI Solution:
Petron Plus Metalform 2000 (a concentrate) was added to their existing metal form fluid. The orange peel problem no longer existed, and they could pull and stretch more parts without having to coat every part. They approved Petron Plus Metalform 2000-P (a finished product) to be used in this application.

Customer Challenge:
A major Aerospace company in Europe was having problems in milling five exotic aerospace material; QAJ Nickel, EAK St. Steel, 611C Corrodible Steel, TAF Titanium, & INCO (901).

PPGI Solution:
They added Petron Plus Metalpro Alpha to their existing coolant. They reported the following: A 22.22% wear reduction, a 9.18% wear reduction, a 0.01% wear increase, a 22.20% wear reduction, a 18.98% wear reduction.

Customer Challenge:
A large Aerospace Machine Shop in Connecticut mills aircraft structural parts for major aircraft and aerospace companies. They work mostly with 7050, 7075, and 2219 aluminum alloy, as well as titanium. They were experiencing difficulty in milling these parts with their current lubricants.

PPGI Solution:
They switched to Petronomics Heavy-Duty, General-Purpose Soluble Machining Oil. They reported: Increase Tool Life as Much as 150% to 200%, Increased Production, Dramatically Improved the General Working Environment, Eliminated Smoke and Odor, Reduced Make-Up Demand, Reduced Down-Time and Parts Costs.

Customer Challenge:
The same Aerospace Machine Shop in Connecticut listed above submitted an up-dated report 2 years later.

PPGI Solution:
They Reported: ...we continue to experience the extended tool life and improved working environment by using your ...coolant in our milling operation. We have also determined that the finish of our aerospace parts has much improved. ...the need to now remove only 30% to 40% of what we used to in the finishing dept. saves time and money with a vastly better finished look.

What can the patented power of Petron Plus Formula 7 do for you?

3 Reasons Why Lube Oils Fail

Contamination

Contamination can be thought of as anything entering the lubricant that is not intended to be there. It can be anything and everything. Examples of external sources are dirt, water and process-related liquids or materials. If these contaminants cannot be removed from the system by means of filtration, dehydration, etc., a more drastic approach will need to be implemented (i.e., an oil change).

A form of contamination that’s often forgotten about is from internal sources. Machine wear and oil degradation byproducts must be treated the same as the external sources.

So what happens if we leave the contamination in the system? This depends on what contaminant has infected the system. In nearly every case, these contaminants will decrease the life expectancy of the asset when left unchecked.

Oil degradation

Oil Degradation, specifically oxidation, is another thing that will trigger an oil change. Oxidation occurs when atmospheric oxygen combines with hydrocarbon molecules and undergoes a chemical change. This chemical change results in the catastrophic and permanent change to a different chemical make-up for the oil molecule. The rate at which the oil molecules react with the oxygen depends on a number of factors, but the most prevalent is temperature.

 Like many other chemical reactions, oxidation rates increase exponentially with increasing temperature, as governed by the Arrhenius equation. A good rule of thumb to use is that oil oxidation doubles for every 10 degrees Celsius above 75 degrees Celsius. Another way to look at it is that for every 10 degrees Celsius the temperature is increased, you cut in half the life of the oil. (50 °F above 167 °F)

 So what happens if you let the oil degrade? The eventual breakdown of the molecules is inevitable. It can be prolonged by keeping the oil clean, cool and dry, but it will eventually happen. When it does, the byproducts of the reaction are harmful for machine health.

 First to form are carboxylic acids. These acids are relatively weak, but they can start to corrode machine surfaces if left in a system for a great deal of time. Left unchecked, the now heavily oxidized oil will start to form sludge and varnish. This sludge and varnish can cause filter plugging, blockage of critical oil clearances, valve restriction and many other precursors to machinery failure.

Additive Depletion

Many additives are consumed or chemically depleted while performing their function. This means that when they are used, they are done. There’s no coming back. After being totally consumed, the additive can no longer provide the special property it was imparting on the base oil. The lubricant’s performance then suffers, and again the oil must be changed.

 No more additives left in reserve? Detergents, dispersants, viscosity improvers and anti-scuff and corrosion inhibitors are just a few of the many additives oil companies are blending into lubricants to complement and enhance the performance of the base oil. Each one of these additives has a finite life, and when they reach the end of that life, you can forget about any advantage they helped provide. Some machines rely heavily on this advantage, and when it goes, so does the life expectancy of the machine.

 These three factors are why we change oil. No matter what you do, eventually you will have to change it. However, the cleaner, cooler and drier it is kept, the longer you will be able to go between those changes.

Below are technical service bulletins

Companies reported savings with PPG products.

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Advice for improving oil with additives.

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Q&A guideline for purchasing lubricants

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Achieving zero failures is possible

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5 ways to prevent bearing failures

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A quick test for wear debris in oil

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Best practices for analyzing gear failures.

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Advice for using synthetic lubricants.

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How much cash is your lube practices costing you.

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Practical solutions to lubrication failures.

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Ten threats to bearing reliability.

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the critical role of additives in lubrication.

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